Beer in the Middle Ages

 

Beer passed from Egypt to Europe following the Crusades. The knights returned to their countries taking beer with them. From the 7th and 8th centuries, monastic communities began to make and consume beer.

At that time, the monks lived as the villagers but more isolated from the village. The water, unhealthy by the hygienic conditions of the moment, was a permanent transmitter of infections. Boiling it with cereals resulted in a healthier drink. As it was produced and consumed in the day to day, the beer hardly had alcohol, and it is estimated that the average town consumed about 6 liters of beer per person daily.

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